Book Review: Don’t Overthink It

Don't Overthink It

Title: Don’t Overthink It: Make Easier Decisions, Stop Second-Guessing, and Bring More Joy to Your Life

Author: Anne Bogel

Genre: Nonfiction

Release Date: March 3, 2020

“You can’t control what happens in life, but you can control how you choose to interpret things.” – Anne Bogel, Don’t Overthink It

Let me make one thing clear right off the bat: I love Anne Bogel. She is one of my idols. I listened to her book podcast What Should I Read Next? before ever entering into my own book journey. I read her blog, Modern Mrs Darcy, consistently, and I’m a member of its online book club (which I pay $10 for, and it’s worth every penny).

When I saw the opportunity to become a part of Bogel’s launch team for her upcoming book, Don’t Overthink It, I jumped at the chance.

I’ve read and enjoyed Bogel’s previous books, Reading People and I’d Rather Be Reading, so I had high hopes for this one, and it didn’t disappoint.

If you find yourself overthinking over every little thing you do, from what to make for dinner for the week, rethinking that big purchase you just made, to going back and correcting every little minute detail in a project you’ve been working on, this book is for you. And as I am guilty of all of the above, this book was tailor-made for me.

Bogel mixes research on overthinking topics such as decision-making, how we choose to spend our money, and how our actions affect those around us, with her own personal experiences. I like reading nonfiction books like this, because you get to learn while also being entertained by stories.

Bogel’s tips and tricks on how to curb your overthinking habits are useful, as well. I would oftentimes think to myself “Huh. I never thought of it that way.” or “Huh. That seems like such a simple solution, why has no one brought it up before?

For example: in Chapter 8 titled “Why It’s Important to Limit Your Options,” Bogel mentions eating the same meal every day or making dinners that your family is guaranteed to like instead of worrying about making something new.

I’m constantly looking for new recipes to try and psyching myself up when making it and worrying that it’s not going to taste good or that no one will like it. Why do I put myself through that instead of just making something I’m already familiar with that I know will get eaten by everyone in my family?

Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy making new recipes, but I came to the realization that I don’t have to put myself through the overthinking and worry as often as I’ve been doing. If I limit my choices, I can take some of that mental strain off myself and be happier for it.

“Some situations in life are never going to be 100 percent resolved, so why not strive to preserve your mental energy by resolving the things you can?” – Anne Bogel, Don’t Overthink It

Bogel’s main point in this book is to reframe your thinking and spend less time worrying so you can enjoy the experience of what is happening in your life. It’s a sentiment that we all need to be reminded of, and reading this book will give you the tools you need to do just that.

My Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 

https://amzn.to/320DhcJ

 

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